Google Maps memorializes Richard Overton

From the Austin American-Statesman –
Herman: Thanks to Google Maps, Mr. Overton is still sitting on his porch

Before his death at the age of 112, Austin resident Richard Overton was known as the oldest WWII veteran and the oldest man in America.

Google Maps Street View has been showing Mr Overton sitting on his front porch at his home in east Austin:  Google Maps Street View shows Richard Overton, WWII veteran

Chrome’s new drawing app

Since starting to work as a TVC for Google, I’ve gotten used to using a Chrome OS at work. One thing I’ve missed is a painting app for quick-and-dirty edits of screenshots and the like. I’m hesitant to search the Chrome browser store every time I want an app that I’m used see bundled into Windows, so mostly I’ve just taken care of where I carved out my screenshots before sending them to customers.

Well, those of us on the Chrome OS (and anyone who uses the Chrome browser) now have a quick drawing tool readily available, according to Mashable.

Canvas can be accessed at canvas.apps.chrome, without downloading an app. It’s got the basics – just enough to obscure an account number or other identifying information, or circle the single entry field that needs attention on a form, before forwarding a screenshot to a customer.

36-hour beef rump roast sous vide

Beef rump roast ($3.29 / pound), cut to 2.5 inches thick

Seasoned with beef fajita seasoning and beef stock concentrate

Sous vide cooked for about 36 hours at 130 degrees

Verdict:
36 hours was too long – the consistency was very soft, “like paté” as my wife said.

Next time: a good cut, but try it at 24 hours (like the usual shoulder cut) instead of 36

‘The Philosopher Redefining Equality’ — The New Yorker

The Philosopher Redefining Equality , an article in the latest New Yorker, describes the work of professor Elizabeth Anderson (of the University of Michigan).

I’m still reading the article , but one takeaway for public speaking is Anderson’s advice to a new Ph.D worried about giving talks at conferences:

“Don’t write up,” Anderson advised. “Just do PowerPoint slides.” … She went on, “Give the big picture, make points to motivate the idea, and punt all the objections to the Q. & A. What ensues is a very lively Q. & A.”

Chuang knitted her brow. An esteemed philosopher at Oxford reads his talks, she said.

“Yeah, horrible,” Anderson said. “So retro.” The issue was that people were afraid of questions, and tried to address them all preëmptively. She laughed darkly: Hhhh-aahr-aahr-aahr. “Philosophers are too risk averse, and this makes listening to philosophers tedious.”

BoingBoing – ‘Myers-Briggs personality test deemed expensive and silly’

BoingBoing amusingly introduces a Digg article by Merve Emre by saying

The Myers-Briggs personality test is the internet’s sorting hat, beloved of twittering nerds, Tumblr addicts and Facebook oversharers alike (I’m in House ESFPI)…

Emre’s biggest criticism of the MBTI cult is one I share – the idea that the MBTI type is fixed and immutable, rather than a useful description of your preferences and mindset at the moment you’re taking the test – excuse me, the “indicator”.